Big Rowan Ackison (greensh) wrote,
Big Rowan Ackison
greensh

Path to Awareness - Part 10 – Loneliness

Loneliness is when you miss people or a specific person. Loneliness is the result of attaching importance to being ignored or disapproved. It is an attachment to support, encouragement and reassurance. To be with people is to live with their rules and expectations. Meeting other people’s expectations leads to tension.

Loneliness is not cured by human company. Loneliness is cured by contact with reality – dropping illusions, making contact with the real.

Dying the need to have people: in the beginning it can feel awful and lonely. After a time you will find it to be no truly lonely. It becomes a solitude, an aloneness. At that point you will know what love is, what God is, what reality is. Giving up attachments can be tough unless we have a keen understanding or have suffered. Suffering can be used to end suffering. The solitude path allows suffering to run its course and inevitably breaks the attachment to the suffering. Jesse Herman expresses this in “Siddhartha”:

"The river laughed. Yes, that was how it was. Everything that was not suffered to the end and finally concluded, recurred, and the same sorrows were undergone."

· loneliness is when you are missing people
· loneliness is cured by aloneness
· aloneness is when you are enjoying yourself
· aloneness is real

What is REAL? It cannot be named and can only be contacted when the unreal is dropped. The unreal can only be contacted when you detach. You can only know true aloneness when clinging and dependency is dropped. Aloneness is full of reality. Loneliness is full of emptiness. We try to fill loneliness with T.V., radio, books, people and toys. This is a big business in our culture. This business would be bankrupt is you and I felt aloneness instead.
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