Big Rowan Ackison (greensh) wrote,
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Christian Businesses - Part Two

Question: "What principles should distinguish a Christian business?"

Below are abbreviated thoughts from a web page that answers this question. The short-hand answer is integrity, commitment to excellence, and commitment to people. The long-hand answer gets into witnessing to the world and using the Bible as a reference for the mutual submission of employer (earthly master) and employee (slave). Note... I am not saying I agree with these. I just feel strongly that sincere opinions should be heard in a contentious debate like Hob Lob.

Abbreviated from http://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-business.html

Answer: Are there certain laws, rules, or principles that delineate a secular business enterprise from that of a Christian business? What are the identifying hallmarks of a Christian business? Are there any biblical guidelines to managing a Christian business?

1. First is integrity. Integrity is about Christ-centered living. It is about doing what is right rather than what is expedient. The organization with integrity will make its business decisions based on the standards and principles of God—righteousness, truth and honesty.

2. Second is a commitment to excellence. Paul said, “This is a trustworthy saying. And I want you to stress these things, so that those who have trusted in God may be careful to devote themselves to doing what is good. These things are excellent and profitable for everyone” (Titus 3:8). If an organization is to be recognized as an exemplary one, one whose goal is to glorify God through its commitment to excellence in its service and product, it must always honor God and be thoroughly cognizant of its role and mission in a pagan world. Such an organization never forgets that God has called them to be His witness to the lost world in which they do business.

3. Finally, a Christian business should have a commitment to its people. This includes the area of fair compensation, performance recognition, and providing growth opportunities, both professionally and personally. The apostle Paul indirectly addressed relationships between employers and employees. To those who work for someone else, Paul gave this command: “Slaves, obey your earthly masters in everything; and do it, not only when their eye is on you and to win their favor, but with sincerity of heart and reverence for the Lord. Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving” (Colossians 3:22-24). Then to employers, Paul commanded, “Masters, provide your slaves with what is right and fair, because you know that you also have a Master in heaven” (Colossians 4:1). Paul gave this command to employers because, just as their employees report to them, they themselves have someone to report to—their Master in heaven. Employers could hardly expect to be treated fairly by God if they failed to treat their employees fairly. Paul’s remarks concerning the employee/employer relationship involve the mutual submission of employees to their employers and vice versa. Employees, too, are to treat their employers with respect and “obey them not only to win their favor when their eye is on you, but like slaves of Christ, doing the will of God from your heart” (Ephesians 6:6).
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